Booker T Camper, Jr CPA PLLC

Booker T Camper, Jr CPA PLLC


Please feel free to read our client newsletter. It is provided to keep you up to date on the latest tax and accounting news.


Client Update Newsletter: November 2022

Social Security recipients got some great news about their benefits. Check out this month's newsletter to learn more about the cost-of-living increase for 2023.

Also read about several tax court cases and what they might mean for your situation, how to raise a financially savvy child, and how to avoid gift card fraud during the upcoming holiday season.

Please feel free to forward this newsletter to someone who may be interested in a topic and call with any questions you may have.

Contents

Social Security to See Significant Adjustment for 2023

Social Security Infographic image


Tax Court Corner

Tax Court Corner imageHere’s a roundup of several recent tax court cases and what they mean for you.

Thou Shalt Not Commingle Funds

(Vorreyer, TC Memo 2022-97, 9/21/22)

Don't let sloppy record keeping prevent you from deducting legitimate business expenses. The Tax Court agreed with the IRS that business expenses must first be deducted on that business's tax return before flowing to the owner's tax return.

Facts: A married couple, the sole shareholders of an S corporation, operated a family farm in Illinois. In 2012 they paid the farm’s utility bills of $21,000 and property taxes of $109,000 from their personal funds, then deducted these payments on their individual Form 1040 tax return as business expenses.

Even though the utility and property tax bills were legitimate business expenses, the deduction was disallowed because the expenses should have first been deducted on the farm's S corporation tax return, then flowed through to the shareholder's individual tax return.

Tax Tip: To pay an expense on behalf of your business, first make a capital contribution to your business, then have your business pay the expense. Then include this expense on your business's tax return.

Adding Tax Insult to Injury

(Dern TC Memo 2022-90, 8/30/22)

Payments received to settle a physical injury or illness lawsuit are generally considered non-taxable income. But you better be sure that the lawsuit you file is actually to compensate for a physical injury or illness, and not something else.

Facts: Thomas Dern, a sales representative for a paint products company in California, was hospitalized for acute gastrointestinal bleeding and a subsequent heart attack. When the company fired him because he could no longer do his job, he sued for wrongful termination. The parties eventually reached a settlement.

Dern argued in Tax Court that his illness led to his firing, and therefore the settlement should be classified as non-taxable income. The payment he received, however, was to settle a discrimination lawsuit and not a physical injury. The settlement therefore did not qualify to be non-taxable income.

Tax Tip: Pay attention to the tax consequences of settlement payments so you don't get surprised with an unexpected tax bill.

You're Stuck With the Standard Deduction

(Salter, TC Memo 2022-49, 4/5/22)

Facts: Shawn Salter, a resident of Arizona, requested and received a distribution of $37,000 from his retirement plan after being laid off from his job in 2013. Salter failed to file a tax return for 2013, so the IRS created a substitute tax return for him using the standard deduction of $6,500 for a single taxpayer. The IRS also assessed an early withdrawal penalty of 10% on the distribution.

Salter, arguing that the distribution was to pay for medical expenses which aren't subject to the 10% early withdrawal penalty, eventually did file a 2013 tax return with $25,000 of itemized medical expenses. The Tax Court disallowed the $25,000 of itemized deductions, stating that once a substitute return is created by the IRS using the standard deduction, the taxpayer can no longer claim itemized deductions for that year.

Tax Tip: Try to avoid a situation where the IRS files a substitute tax return on your behalf. Once this happens, you have no choice but to use the standard deduction for that tax year.


Raising a Financially Savvy Child

Raising a Financially Savvy Child imageIf you have children or grandchildren, you have an opportunity to give them a jump-start on their journey to becoming financially responsible adults. While teaching your child about money and finances is easier when you start early, it's never too late to impart your wisdom. Here are some age-relevant suggestions to help develop a financially savvy young adult:

Knowing about money — how to earn it, use it, invest it and share it — is a valuable life skill. Simply talking with your children about its importance is often not enough. Find simple, age-specific ways to build their financial IQ. A financially savvy child will hopefully lead to a financially wise adult.


'Tis the Season for Gift Card Fraud

Tis the Season for Gift Card Fraud imageWith supply chain snarls still plaguing parts of the U.S. economy, many consumers are turning to gift cards as the holiday present of choice this year. In fact, according to the website Research and Markets, the United States gift card industry is expected to reach $188 billion in 2022.

Why is gift card fraud such a problem?

Because of the small dollar amounts involved, gift card fraudsters face a low probability of prosecution. It's also easy to convert gift card value to cash or merchandise. In other words, this kind of fraud is relatively risk-free and easy to pull off.

In one common scam, a crook goes to a retail establishment, grabs a handful of gift cards from an out-of-the-way stand or kiosk, and records the card numbers using a magnetic strip reader. After returning the cards, the crook heads home and repeatedly checks balances on the merchant’s website until the numbers are activated.

The thief then spends or transfers the money on the card before the legitimate buyer or gift recipient has a chance to use it. Less sophisticated scammers may simply scratch off the card’s coating and replace it with a sticker, hoping the buyer won’t notice.

You can scam-proof your gift card experience by following these tips:

If you think you’ve been scammed, contact the store directly and report incidents to local law enforcement.


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